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president al gore talking about hurricane katrina in his 2006 academy winning documentary, an inconvenient truth. the movie for those of you who have not seen it, warns us that due to climate change, we will experience many more super storms like sandy which forecasters say was the largest hurricane in atlantic history. climate change deniers will say the weather has always been weird. here are some inconvenient truths that they may want to consider. in the 1970s, there were just an average of under eight named storms per year. named storms like the a b c. in the 198hehe ample w ju ju u uerer nine ---- the average was just under nine per year. in the 1990s, it was about 11 named storms per year. in the 2000s it jumped to nearly 15 storms a year and get this, in the first three years of this decade, 2010, 2011, 2012 the average is just under 19. specifically, we had 19 named storms in 2010. we had 18 in 2011 and so far we've had 19 named storms and there is an entire month left in hurricane season this year
andrew and katrina. welcome, mr. dan tony. how do you think this storm is going to rank as compared with the biggest storm ever, which was katrina, in terms of insured losses, and andrew? >> well, katrina was an $80 billion insurance convenient, not take nothing consideration the economic impact as well. and a much different type of storm. the biggest problem with sandy it is a densely populated area of the country. early on in the claims process, i believe that the estimates of $20 billion range could be close. then you also have to look at the economic impact with the new york stock exchange being closed for two days, quite a few petroleum refineries shutdown along the east coast that could have an effect, as you had in an earlier broadcast that the airlines -- >> talk me -- >> thousands of flights. >> let's say i'm a small business owner, i own a pizza shop on the jersey shore or i own a dry cleaner out in queens that was damaged, what typically is covered under my business policy that i carry and what suspect? if it's flooding is it covered? >> unfortunately, flooding is an addi
with hurricane katrina. here's live in studio with me just moments away. >>> and you know this storm is throwing a big monkey-wrench into the battle for the white house. battleground states are in hurricane sandy's path. which candidate does the storm help or hurt? what if there was a new way to deal with money that focused less on fees and more... on what matters? maybe your bank account is taking too much time and maybe it's costing too much money. introducing bluebird by american express and walmart. your alternative to checking and debit. it's loaded with features, not fees. because we think your money should stay where it belongs. with you. the value you expect. the service you deserve. it feels good to bluebird. get it at your local walmart. >>> this is your prais for breaking coverage of hurricane sandy and the election. we will be carrying this at least until 11:00 p.m. eastern tonight, possibly longer if it warrants, because this storm is forecast to be a monster when it makes landfall. don't go anywhere. a lot of people said they are holed up in hotel rooms and stuck at airports watchi
. >> eric: may i bring -- >> bob -- holdon. >> kimberly: by the way, what happened to bush and katrina? did they do the same thing? it's okay there, but not here. being politically expedient again? >> bob: there are 77 people dead. romney and his people talk about how obama was not prepared. >> greg: you talk about climate change. >> eric: let me do this. i'll bring this back to why i put the two things in the same segment, bob. here is why. we gave him $1 trillion. the administration $1 trillion to beef up the infrastructure. they spent $1 trillion making the grid. burying the grid underground so that every time it's 50-mile-per-hour wind we don't have half the country losing power. that would have been a good use of stimulus money. better use. >> bob: bury new jersey under the ground in four years? >> eric: let me put it this way. $1 trillion closer to getting it done. what did we get with the money we spent? >> kimberly: nothing. >> bob: republicans have to think of something besides sandy to make a case in the final four days. >> greg: that is the point. >> dana: romney did not. what he
katrina and during the hurricane. and that's going to be the big angle, i think. otherwise we all guess as to how it affects turnout for elections. and that can go either way. >> you know, dana, it seems as if the white house by the president going back this morning before doing that event in orlando, it's an acknowledgment of they made a mistake going down last night. it seemed like a good idea probably friday when they decided to do that, get down a little bit early, maybe they get something in, and then now wait a minute, woke up this morning, what are we doing here? >> it's one of those things, chuck, when you get to the moment of the crisis, it's obvious what you need to do. when you're planning ahead, the campaign people obviously want to squeeze one more event in before they know he has to come back to washington. it was a mistake. it's probably not going to hurt him in any significant way. it reinforces what clarence said, that the focus will be for the next several days on the president much more than governor romney. >> kim, governor romney does not have a full-time job right
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
lieutenant general russel. he coordinated military relief efforts for hurricane katrina. general, thanks for being here. >> good to be with you, al. >> tell me, what are you seeing as this storm slams into the new jersey coast? >> i think this is another history making moment. we're watching history be made and recording it. because of the size of the storm and the enormous amount of population underneath that storm as it come ashore, we are riding the bar for how we will respond and prepare for storms like this in the future. again, my biggest concern is the elderly, disabled, and poor people who did not evacuate and right now their lights are going out and they may not be prepared as they should be. it's the 29th of the month. their food is running low and didn't have the money to restock. they will need help in the coming hours once this storm passes and the challenge will be how do we get food and evacuation to that needed population? >> so the challenge for those cities, states, and fema is how to deal with getting whatever necessary help is needed for the elderly and the poor who a
'd go back to covering hurricane katrina. we thought it's a situation so much different at night than when the sun came up. i'm weary about what is going to happen tomorrow and damage and people that may have been hurt. thank you. now to new york city. heavy wind and rain is hammering the city now, large sections of manhattan without power, parts of lower manhattan, edison purposely cutting off power to prevent damage. a collapsed train in mid town is dangling from a high rise. david lee is live from chelsea. david lee? >> that is right. we're at the intersection of 24th and 8th. take a look. what do you see? you see nothing. pitch black. all the way down, 24th street here in new york city, manhattan, all the lights are out on this street. this is a scene all of lower manhattan. we've observed people walking through streets flashlight in hand trying to figure out how serious this problem is. if you take a look up 8th avenue you'll see a handful of vehicles. here come a few cars. furrer south you go, it seems more dire the situation. the greater the flooding. the tip is very low lying.
is now being called new jersey and new york's katrina. >> it's big deal. >> thanks christine. >>> here's a look at the latest outage numbers in our area -- >>> this morning, police continue to investigate a fatal pedestrian accident in jermantown. sky 9 was over the scene yesterday when a 15-year-old was killed on jermantown road at wisteria drive. the victim has been identified as christina morris-ward. she was a tenth grader at seneca valley high school and he was walking to -- she was walking to school. julie wolf excuse me is live on the scene in jermantown and she has more on where things are moving forward today. julie, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you mike, we are here less than a half a mile from seneca value legal high school. this is where christina morris- ward was trying to cross the road and make it here on the way to school when she was hit and killed. montgomery county police tell me they are still reconstructing the accident. here at the scene yesterday, they told me that the driver did stop to help after the accident. and he was the one with the green lig
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
. do you think they would have run the new orleans marathon the week of katrina? >> right. i don't think so. >> steve: of course not. >> gretchen: rest of the headlines for saturday. president obama ordering the military to send extra gallons of fuel to new york and in the wake of seand. gas shortages unless people panicked. gas will be rationed starting at noon people with license plates ending in odd number will only be able to buy gas. cars with license plates ending in even number can fill up on even numbered days. four ohio men busted for stealing mitt romney campaign signs. some were found in a union truck. police found tools that could be used to take signs down. local campaign workers have had problems with signs being stolen. this the is first time someone has been caught. the men were arrested and face misdemeanor charges. people in parts ofism know are going to have to pony up extra money if they want to buy a gun now. cook county, which includes chicago, has approved a tax that charges people 2 a dollars for every gun that they buy. well, the move is expected to raise
. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there, after hurricane katrina, what that is like to search for relatives. it takes days and days to figure out where folks are and sort it out. if this is search and rescue effort are we assuming people that they are trying to get to and find are okay, that they are alive, not injured, they are in fairly decent condition? >> yeah. the last we talked to executives here, from the county, no fatalities. they felt confident about that. of course until they get in there themselves and see we're not going to have final word. we're keeping fingers crossed. we do have a little bit of cell phone, it's spotty. there is no power. we were speaking to another woman before who said they had jet skis, that they stored for the winter, her husband took it out. he was ferrying people around to dry land, coming back here. people coming in reporting who is left, neighbors that need help. that is helping. daylight's important. as you know, officials here scrambling to do house-to-house searches while they have light because there's no power in the area. >> thank
katrina and 9/11. this is actually a company that charles has talked about before. take a look at how the dollar is faring today. ♪ from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. >> 22 minutes past the hour. i am jamie colby with your fox news minute. some subways are rolling again. none of them are going into lower manhattan which is still without power. long lines to get a shuttle bus into the city. they carry more than 5 million people a day. the commuter railroads are providing service. in the meantime, all fares are waived through midnight tomorrow night. all three new york airports are back in service. even on a limited basis. laguardia was the last to come back online due to flooding. everyone should confirm flights before heading to the airport. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail. after three days focusing on the federal response to the storm, the president w
, there is debris everywhere but there isn't just devastation. this is an katrina that watch everything away. these buildings still exist. there is a heck of a clean up here to do but this can come back. a little worse down the beach in seaside heights and atlantic city but it will come back but look. look at this debris. junk everywhere. this is going to take a while. this is the roof of the tiki bar which is 300 yards up the beach. this was the roof of it and that is deposited here. i leave you with this shot at the atlantic ocean. it occurred to me today that as i look out there it is almost like nothing happened. the ocean is saying i was upset but i am calm now. i may not stay calm forever but you are good for while. connell: that pictures of beautiful and to come back to the isolation is jarring. what stood out to you today? today is the first day you had a chance to walk around the. >> exactly. the first sunny day. the first real nice day. you hit it exactly right. the contrast in the devastation and the beauty. this is typically what we see after hurricane. took a couple extra days b
the team. we led the team that won the pulitzer for -- for hurricane katrina in biloxi. hurricanes are very unpredictable. when you first have the path coming up hugging the coast, maybe turning eastward out to see, now move that pressure -- to sea, now move that pressure system that will turn it in over our heads in d.c., you know, you don't know what's going to happen. particularly with nine days out to the election, these days are crucial for the campaigns to get out on the road, hit the swing states. those states that are going to be critical in deciding the next president. so this tosses a lot up in the air. >> brian, stand by for me. we created this pictures here. we put together -- we're showing the campaign layers, if you will, impacted by the storm hitting the east coast. so you know, we're already seeing, as you mentioned, some of the campaign events across the country for romney or boom delayed or canceled. we are expecting huge travel delays in addition to impacting millions of travelers. the campaigns may have to do last-minute maneuvering. also a major storm hitting the most d
far in advance. >> have you covered many hurricane, katrina and isaac. compare, if you can, for us, some of the images you are seeing of sandy and images that you yourself took from those two storms? >> well, katrina was a fascinating experience, very destructive and the biggest storm i think i have seen, certainly the most destructive hurricane. i was -- dicover isaac a few months ago and irene in new york city. people are learning very quickly, the power of water. it doesn't sound that dramatic. but, boy, when you see it energized and pushed up the way sandy was, it's an awakening. >> we have had at least 69 deaths reported from sandy, so far from when it touched down in the cribbia, to here across the east coast. what about the dangers of the storms? you personally? have you ever experienced close calls? >> hurricane charlie in 2004, intensified unexpectedly and turned and came into the ponte gorda area in florida and nearly killed my partner, greg, a meteorologist and myself. i have learned to be extra careful. i was very satisfied to see how much warning was given regarding sa
know, put katrina at one end. that was $100 billion. put irene at another end. that was a $13 billion event. i've seen 30 to 50. it feels, especially after you see that aerial video of what happens on the shores of new jersey, like it may be more along the 30 to 50 range when you talk about total property damage and you talk also about lost business activity. it was down in wall street. >> especially at a time when the economy was -- there was a sense it was starting to slow down again. we haven't had the strongest economy anyway. are we more vulnerable to this? >> i don't want to say there's an up side to this, but you could have a situation where some of the construction and some of the rebuilding happens in the same quarter where you had the business loss, so you have a really net no change to gdp. if there are major construction projects undertaken -- for example, let's say they decide the biggest financial center in the world should not be a foot over sea level, that's a major investment that could have a positive back on gdp. >> that's a great point, steve. as far as the idea th
. they probably have enough money to deal with this. we learned in 2005 with katrina, if the federal response is sluggish or looks unprepared for this, that's a worse damage to the president than anything else, and i think that the president has to do this. he's canceled four events in four states over the next two days. right now he's scheduled to go to green bay at the end of the tuesday. we'll see if that happens. probably unlikely. he may start again on wednesday when he's supposed in ohio. >> although to his benefit you could argue in some of the key states, places like new york and new jersey and connecticut, they're very strong governors there who are experienced with this stuff and unlikely to fumble the response. we'll see how that goes. let's bring in congresswoman marcia blackburn, a republican from tennessee. what impact do you think this storm will have to the presidential race? >> i'm not certain that it's going to have any direct impact. i will say that our thoughts and prayers are definitely with everyone and with the elected officials that are dealing with this response, with
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
for president bush was of him hugging someone after a natural disaster. you know, the images of katrina, biggest single thing beyond the war in iraq that undermined confidence in president bush's leadership. you cannot get those images out of your head as you watch this stuff. >> except, you know what, katty kay? there is a certain appeal that i think is coming as a relief to people who are tired, who are tired of the vitriol, of the stupidity. and a politician who can work with the other side, isn't that something that in this new age of politics that's appealing? >> it's huge. and i think it's probably almost the overriding priority of whoever gets elected next tuesday is to be able to make this country governable again. and to be able to do that by bringing about a certain amount of cooperation on the things america needs to do between republicans and democrats. we saw it yesterday between chris christie and brearack oba. and it's going to be very interesting to watch today as the campaign trail resumes, whether there's a different tone. i wouldn't be surprised -- we've heard the president us
that everyone here and watching has in their plot and abiding concerns tragedy ofted by the katrina and its aftermath. that said, we have a celebration .onight >> he probably did not hear the fans try to correct him indian audience. they later clarified that the commissioner obviously meant to nothurricane sandy and in 2005.hich happened >> how do you like that? >> brandon got off to a great start in the season opener. scored eight points for the game that. thecavaliers held off wall,'s without john injured, sitting on the bench. 84 was the final score, not way the wizard's wanted to start the season. >> it's 41 degrees. more news at 5:30. >> federal workers and students o normal routines toda president obama: there's just no quit in america... and you're seeing that right now. over five million new jobs. exports up forty one percent. home values... rising. our auto industry... back. and our heroes are coming home. we're not there yet, but we've made real progress and the... last thing we should do is turn back now. here's my plan for the next four years: making education and training a nat
. that's allstate's stand. are you in good hands? megyn: after katrina hit the gulf coast everybody wanted water and ice. after sandy the hot commodity is gasoline. some people driving 50 miles just to fill up the tank. >> reporter: a travel catch-22. you have roads being opened, you have gas stations in most cases that are not open. and the reason they are not open is gas stations need power to pump the fuel and across the tristate area there is very little power to go around. many have likened this to the gas crunch of the 1970s. remember the long lines? people lining up to fill up. there are 200 cars long, the lines to get gasoline in some cases to fill these things up. they are trying to get gas to run their generators because they don't have power antigen rayer toes burn between 4-5 gallons per hour. that's why people are on foot. there are also people filling up their cans to fill up their cars. >> if you drive around in circles you will run out much gas owner. sitting in line in the truck it burns 5 gals. >> reporter: the gas stations are worried about their gas supply being
in katrina whourp really never in danger and there was no problem. i was walking around times square tonight where there was virtually no wind. very little rain. and it was very hard, in times square and in midtown manhattan, to feel a connection to all of these flooding problems that were happening in lower manhattan. and also, in times square, as you know, the power was full on. and didn't look like there was any electrical problem whatsoever in that part of town. so this is really, it seems, problems are almost all isolated in terms of manhattan, anyway, below 34th street? >> most of the problems at the moment in manhattan seem to be south of 34th street. we're obviously having significant problems in the other burroughs as well. new yorkers are a big united family and when the sun comes up you'll see people from all over the city pitching in to help each other particularly those who are lucky notify to have george unscathed. they'll have the time and resources and the ability to pitch in and help others. >> thank you for joining us, christine quinn. thank you. >> take care and be safe, b
to katrina and crazy storms like that and just amazing and i mean we weren't kidding when we were saying five to seven days, may be two weeks for some people and i know everyone went to the grocery stores and grabbed whatever they could. the way i've seen it, it plays out, the first day is interesting. you don't have power. the second day you start to get a little annoyed as you have no more ice and things start to go bad, day three, four and five, people just start getting angry and it's not fun and it gets ugly in a hurry. >> let me ask you just really quickly because the storm is continuing to move and i got this update on the potential impact in the midwest. chicago lake shore flood warning, high winds in indiana, extreme high winds in northwest ohio. >> damage in cleveland yesterday. >> 23,000 without power in michigan. a village in wisconsin. evacuated at least partially due to sandy. how long are we going to continue to feel the effects of sandy. >> a little bit in those areas but not as bad as yesterday and people saying lake erie was at the highest levels of off of cleveland they've
. >> it was biggest in its size, not its strength. katrina was a stronger hurricane. a lot of them have been stronger storms but not as big. either way, very destructive. we are not selling sandy short at this hour. >> yeah, let's not do this. >> very respectful. good news is conditions are getting better around here. we'll be looking at -- it won't be a bright sunny day but maybe a peek or two of sunshine. we are getting the rain and wind out of here so things will calm down. kids want to go trick or treating later. it will be cool but it shouldn't be raining. >> i think my first graphic is halloween. >> this is all good news considering the last couple of days. >> yeah, this is fantastic. i want to encourage you nobody to come to my neighborhood because we don't have power because that would be pretty scary for the kids. >> i'm a sure they won't be there. >> ghostly clouds, a creepy chill, upper 40s. we should be dry in time for the trick or treaters. during the afternoon, you might catch a little sunshine but with temperatures in the 50s but we'll be falling back into the 40s here by 6:00, 7:00 t
overseas in afghanistan and that have served time with katrina down in new orleans, and they said it doesn't look much different. i would agree with them. even just walking around and having it be dead silent and the hising of natural gas coming out of the ground because of broken mains. we are still as of yesterday, still in search and rescue mode trying to make sure that everybody's out of their house and safe. before the -- they allow people to actually come back. it's a very, very frustrating time, but i can tell you kind of what -- you were talking about with ralph -- clive on the earlier call, the people -- i had the opportunity last night to go to some shelters and talk to some people. they are amazed at the amount of people that are willing to help and total strangers. from the time i was there just -- random citizens just walking into the shelters and donating goods and trying to help their fellow man. it's unfortunate it takes a tragic situation like this to bring the best out of people. host: congressman runyan, what is the best way that the federal government in your view can h
. and if you don't, there's a disaster. let's just look at what happened at hurricane katrina. >> yeah. >> let's look at what happened to hurricane katrina. you know what, though? again this is part of a bigger problem with mitt romney right now and republicans and democrats that are afraid to talk about how you really save this country and tackle the debt. instead, they talked about silly things like cutting fema, cutting big bird or saying we're going to take care of all of our problems by raising some taxes on rich people. instead of talking about saving this country for the next generation. >> and also not being honest about defense. >> and both sides not being honest about defense. >> okay. thank you. >> how's that? >> good. >> i don't define fema as quote big government. >> right. >> i define entitlement programs by their numbers that are going to cripple us as, quote, big government. >> "wall street journal," barack obama -- when the history of this administration is written, maybe someone will note the difference. here is that man who promised a transformative presidency, and it amount
katrina hit and some of the people who were evacuated from new orleans were brought to massachusetts, we gathered them at a military base on cape cod. they thought there are going to houston, by the way. [laughter] and when the airplane said, no, we're going to boston, there were not very happy because it is colder and boston. so the king to give cod. we told our citizens that there were people coming from new orleans who were affected by the hurricane and they might need help. and you know what? there were cars lined up. people dropping of all sorts of goods of all kinds, some things that were temporary like food, but also of tv sets and) it was amazing to see the turn out. it is part of the american way. we have people right now that are having some hard times because of this terrible hurricane and the storm that followed it. and your generosity will make a difference. i want to thank you. we have some work to do. but to make this an enjoyable were sitting, we have asked a great entertainer, randy owen of alabama, to be here. [applause] he is an extraordinary guy. he will probably tell
officiales to set aside partisan differences. when it's botched as it was in the wake of hurricane katrina. they both graps these principles as they toured the shore. -- >> >> follow today east "washington journal" in the video library at cspan.org. live coverage from doswell virginia on c-span. >> i see there are some really young people and others a little bit older but younger. this election is for you, to make sure you have the same opportunities to catch your dream that we had growing up. [applause] and unlike my opponent who wants to be president obama senator, i want to be virginia's senator. [applause] we are so very fortunate to have here in virginia a governor who is leading a come back in the common wealth of virginia. [applause] we need leaders -- what we did, bob you were in the legislature and so was eric at the time. the democrats controlled the general assembly but we cut taxes and made our streets safer, higher ack demics in our schools and over 3,000 jobs were created in those four years. mitt romney was governor of massachusetts also with a democratic legislature and wha
andrew first time, con for hurricane katrina second, and then president obama used it for hurricane isaac to help the people of louisiana and mississippi prepare for isaac just a few months but this is a big deal that the president made this announcement before the hurricane arrived. >> stand by, general. i need to get to boston. he's in boston, coast guard admiral dan abel, he's standing by. because, believe it or not, some people maybe are going to ride out the storm and we want to talk about -- it's going to be a search rescue if people ride out the storm. so admiral, what's the best -- what are people -- what's the best thing people can do to keep safe so you don't have to deal with search and rescue? >> right, don. well, the first thing is folks should already have their boats secured and the waterfront secured and it's time to seek safe haven. at this point if you have got a boat in the water, it's time to lever it where it is and time to go asheer. we've worked with a couple cases this weekend with kayakers trying to enjoy the surf, even a guy on a dingy going out to his mooring bu
hurricane katrina back in new orleans seven years ago. only difference is this is spread out over a much bigger area. puts the storm in perspective. everyone just stay safe. 4 take acold & cough...s [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. honey? ...on the couch. that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you
, if you don't know, covered katrina for us, ap he's prone to understatements, so when he says he went through one of the most harrowing experiences he's experienced. >> says a lot. >> a pretty dramatic statement. you highlight, scott, why you can have so many deaths due to flooding in situations like this, because that water moved so fast and with so much power. >> it does, and as i said, again, at the top of the hour, i said they told us there wou about five more feet of water. we expected it to be a little more gradual than it was, and when it comes up, it comes up fast. it's not a wall of water. it's just that all of a sudden you find yourself with a lot of water around you, and then you're scrambling into your vehicles, including your satellite truck, trying to get out of there with water basically coming up over the foot. i mean, it was that bad. you know, we are all fine. everybody got out of there in one piece, and we hope to be able to send you some pictures later on this evening, or at least tomorrow morning, but it was quite an experience. >> i'll bet. scott, stay safe. you
resources well. i think government will perform well. this is not going to be katrina. when government performs well, they t re-emphasizes in people's minds that government does matter. >> what's your take on the early voting story? you have a new poll showing governor romney still in the lead and certainly they're tied, 47% each, cwhen you look at eary voting turnout. how much of an impact does this storm have on early voting turnout? >> well, some, but so many people have voted. look at ohio. a third of the voters have will be cast their votes. i think early voting has helped with the democratic base. i think the democratic base has gotten more and more enthusiastic, more and more fired up. you're seeing that with the long lines in places in urban centers which tend to be democratic. i think it's going to be a surprisingly good democratic turn youtd. >> all right. we'll leave it there. governor, good to have you on the program. >>> let's go back to julia boorst boorstin. we have more on the disney/lucas film deal. >> that's right, maria. walt disney is acquiring lucas films for $4.05
firm. he was a special adviser to louisiana after hurricane katrina. mark, you worked in fema also. what is the fema response in a situation like this now when there's multiple states to respond to at the same time? >> good evening, lawrence. fema's mission is to support the state and local governments when it exceeds their capacity. an event like this, it becomes that much more challenging. fema has the capacity, they have ten regions they can draw resources from around the nation and bring them to bear where they're much needed. in the case of this storm, fema has leaned forward and pre-positioned those resources in those states. they've been there for days before the storm making landfall. >> what are common mistakes made in situations like this? >> well, the common mistakes are not understanding what the needs of the state and locals are. getting out in front and not having good lines of communication. i think what you've seen in the past in some of the disasters that have been portrayed as failing is because you didn't have that good, clean, crisp lines of communication that y
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